0;136;0c0;136;0c 0;136;0c Blackett Observatory - Marlborough College Blackett Observatory
logo
Blackett Observatory Dome
Welcome to the Marlborough College Blackett Observatory, home to the largest refracting telescope in Wiltshire. Learn more...
Status CURRENT MOON
moon phase info

Solar X-rays Status Status

Geomagnetic Field Status Status
From n3kl.org

SpaceWeather | More weather... Coordinates: 51.25.25 N and 1.44.24 W
Marlborough College
Oxford Astrophysics
Green Templeton College

Monday 29th April: 'The Gravitational Sky' - Professor Mike Cruise (President of the Royal Astronomical Society) will give the lecture for College and Friends in the Garnett Room at 7.30pm


NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day
Meteors, Comet, and Big Dipper over La Palma

What's Up - Week of April 22nd

  • Astronomical twilight ends at 21.31 BST at the start of the week and 22.49 BST at the end

  • The Moon is waning and will be Last Quarter on Friday

  • The Sun is blank again
    There are no ISS passes this week

More...


Random Blackett Image
Projects - GCSE Drawings

News - 26-27th March

Messier Marathon: For the first time, by pupil demand, the College attempted the Messier Marathon. Attempting to see as many of possible of French astronomer Charles Messier's Catalogue, of 'Nebulae and Star Clusters' from 18th Century, in one night by eye. Luckily the choice of night proved correct and after a lovely clear day, we were rewarded with a clear 7.5 hours of observing till cloud closed in at 2.30am. 15 pupils from Remove to Upper Sixth joined CEB, GKWJ, JAG, DGR, JEL and ER and observed till 11pm. One group then stayed on till 2am and the other 'camped' in the Marlburian, ready to observe again at 3am (this didnt happen due to cloud sadly). Some 30 objects were seen by 11pm and another 35 by 2am. From 2am till 2.30am the last 3 were seen, making a pleasing total of 68 out of the 110 possible. Some were certainly harder than others and many were 'yet another' grey smudge. A few however were really brilliant and inspired all there. The furthest object seen was 82 million light years away. The following Messier Objects were seen : M 1, 3, 5, 13, 29, 31, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 53, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 76, 78, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 108, 109, 110. The 10 inch Barclay refractor was in full use, hopping from one object to the next, even with 'reversals' into the opposite hemisphere. The 8 inch Smith reflector was, however, sthe star of the evening, for the brighter objects, and was able to see several objects within an equivalent number of minutes. Stand-out targets were M13 the great globular in Hercules, the Sombrero galaxy, the Cigar galaxy and the Owl nebula (especially with an OIII filter) to name a few. I suspect this will become an annual challenge

21st March

Eratosthenes' experiment: A group of Hundred and Remove astronomers joned CEB and DGR in Court to hopefully reinact Eratosthenes' 205BC experiment to measure the Earth's circumference. Sadly a shadow of the noon Sun was needed. The sky was of course cloudy

Sun-Earth lecture: CEB delivered the 2019 talk 'Reaching young stars' to a select audience of Friends

12th March

House visit: 12 pupils from TU Shell came up to the Dome for the last House visit this academic year. Initially it was clear and the waining Moon was viewed in binos and M42 in the 10 inch. Despite the Moon, M31 could just be seen by eye

Next House visit: September 2019

GCSE Observing: 2 Hundred pupils and 3 Remove pupils camwe up to the Dome and a couple of drawings and star counts were done. Sadly the cloud quickly closed in

More news...